Thursday, June 3, 2010

Upper Delaware in the number one spot in America’s Most Endangered Rivers: 2010

It's a number one rating that no one wants to get. American Rivers released its annual report, America’s Most Endangered Rivers™ of 2010. The 25th anniversary edition of the report spotlights ten rivers facing the most urgent threats, and also features key endangered river success stories from the past two decades.

The Upper Delaware River, the drinking water source for 17 million people across New York, New Jersey and Pennsylvania is at risk from shale fracking for natural gas, a process that poisons groundwater and creates toxic pollution. This threat landed the Upper Delaware in the number one spot in America’s Most Endangered Rivers: 2010 edition.

“Unless we stop the threat of rampant shale fracking, the drinking water for 17 million people across the Northeast will be threatened by toxic pollution,” said Rebecca Wodder, president of American Rivers. “We can’t let natural gas companies fatten their profits by putting our precious clean water at risk.”

“The threats facing this year’s rivers are more pressing than ever, from gas drilling that could pollute the drinking water of millions of people, to the construction of costly and unnecessary new dams, to outdated flood management that threatens public safety,” said Rebecca Wodder, president of American Rivers.

In a statement, the Delaware River Basin Commission took a cautious view of the finding, saying:

"Being named to a “most endangered list” can lead uninformed people to draw incorrect conclusions that the quality of the Upper Delaware River is deteriorating...

Being named to a 'most endangered list' can lead uninformed people to draw incorrect conclusions that the quality of the Upper Delaware River is deteriorating. This is far from the truth and the five members of the Delaware River Basin Commission (DRBC) – Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey, Delaware, and the federal government – intend on keeping it that way. The DRBC recognizes the importance of natural gas development to the region and the nation, and is not opposed to the appropriate development of this natural resource. But we must make sure that any natural gas development is done smartly so we do not harm the incredible water resources of the Delaware River Basin (DRB) and the over 15 million people it serves.”


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